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16 Dos and DONTs whilst travelling to Bali.

DO

• Keep a passport page empty for a visa stamp!

• Learn some of the lingo! English is spoken in Indonesia, but I always think it’s good to try and immerse yourself in the culture and to be as respectful as possible!  selamat pagi (good morning), tolong (please) and terima kasih (thank you) di mana aku bisa menemukan (where can I find…)

• Expect some crowds at some popular hotspots

• Research the vibe you want!  If you’re all about sophistication, then Seminyak might be your best bet, but if you want some rest and relaxation, you might fare better staying in Padang Bai or Nusa Dua.

• Dress appropriately – you can’t walk around in a bikini everywhere as much as Jemimah loves to skin out, you may be turned way at some restaurants or bars and you can’t wear shorts up a mountain (moreso, because you’ll be cold af! More on this in our Mount Batur activities section)

• Plan a budget, if you like the finer things in life some prices can extend to those similar to that in the UK, but you can also live quite happily on a lower budget and still have a great time!

• Watch out for stray dogs and wild animals (especially at night!) Most have rabies and other diseases. Sarah and I were met at night by several stray dogs when we tried to go out for a midnight stroll looking for a convenience store…needless to say, we ended up getting a cab back home

• Be mindful of rainy season (January to April/October/November) Bali’s year round average temperature is around 28 degrees Celsius, but you don’t want to get caught up inside because of a monsoon.

• Barter!Barter!Barter! But do so respectfully!

DON’T

• Bring more than £5,500 in cash with you

• Overstay without ensuring you have a valid visa or you’ll be fined around £50 a day

• Be afraid to move around, navigating the island isn’t particularly difficult, so do your research and hit up different areas to make the most of your trip

• Be too worried about “Bali Belly”. Jemimah suffered from food poisoning heavy on our trip to Thailand, and came heavily prepared for the Bali trip, but surprisingly faced no issues. Hygiene has markedly improved on the island, so be cautious of street vendors, but for the most part you should be OK!

• Forget your reusable bottle at home, for those of us that are environmentally conscious around 60 tonnes of plastic washes up on the beaches annually and we can help combat this, with most restaurants providing free refills or charging a small fee

• Forget to take out enough money at an available ATM as these can sometimes be few and far between. Sarah and I took out cash when we first got to Bali at Denpasar airport (about £300 as e had already prepaid for some of the activities we’d be doing online). Try and stick to reputable ATMS, its rare, but I’ve heard of skimming happening.

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