International Slavery Museum

For years and probs for many more to come, Black people have been trying to explain that slavery is not where our story starts. The curriculum taught in schools isn’t helping, the shows we have on TV aren’t helping either. So, it’s always great to see when an institution is doing its part to educate the masses effectively.

The International Slavery Museum is very comprehensive and I thoroughly enjoyed my exploring. I felt pride, I felt inexplicable sadness and hope – it was a rollercoaster of emotions.

  • There are three main themed galleries:
    • Life in West Africa – exploring the story and culture of Africa and its peoples, who are central to the story of transatlantic slavery.
    • Enslavement and the Middle Passage – revealing some of the brutality and trauma suffered by enslaved Africans on the voyage across the Atlantic; then the oppression of their lives on plantations in the Americas.
    • Legacy – highlighting the continuing fight for freedom and equality; the contemporary impact of transatlantic slavery, such as racism and discrimination; and the achievements of the African Diaspora.

Here are some pictures from my visit:

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Liverpool

This summer has been all about the staycation, so we got involved 😉

Up to Scouseland we went, here’s a rundown of everything we managed to do/see:

  1. Liverpool Wings (Baltic Triangle)
  2. Chinese Arch
  3. Liverpool Cathedral – (Britain’s largest cathedral)
  4. River Cruise
  5. Royal Albert Dock
  6. Merseyside Maritime Museum and Slavery Museum
  7. Tate Liverpool 
  8. Royal Liver Building 
  9. Walker Art Gallery
  10. World Museum (click the link for more)
  11. SuperlambbananaDeveloped for the 1998 ArtTransPennine Exhibition, the sculpture is both a comment on the dangers of genetic engineering and is heavily influenced by the history of Liverpool: historically, both sheep and bananas were common cargos in the city’s docks.
  12. Liverpool wall of fame
  13. Cavern Club
  14. Cilla Black statue
  15. Boujee

Sights we didn’t get to see:

  • Liverpool Stadium 🏟 
  • Beatles museum 
  • Quirky Quarter 
  • Crosby Beach (20 mins by train from Liverpool Lime Street) 

Liverpool is so easily walkable and many of the places to visit are next to each other so you save money on transport.

We were genuinely surprised that we enjoyed our time in Liverpool and we would 100% recommend making your way up north.

Keep up to date with us on @trippinwithsj // @sarahambitious xx

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Stone Town

I remember being in primary school and singing a song about Zanzibar, something about the ships going down there…whilst I don’t remember the song well (obviously). The impression Zanzibar left it my mind never faded, so being next door in Nairobi – I had to make my way to this place that had lived in my imagination for so long.

My 1st stop was Stone Town, it’s the old part of Zanzibar. The architecture mostly dates back to the 19th century, and reflects the diverse influences of the Swahili culture. There are a unique mixture of Arab, Persian, Indian and European elements and for this reason, the town was designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2000. We love a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Before slavery was abolished in Tanzania black people weren’t allowed to live within the city walls (go figure), but in the 21st century any and everyone is free to live here – in true Hakuna Matata fashion. 

Exploring Stone town you find different doors which other than offering a cheeky photo op; they show a history of the demographic within the city. The gold on the doors is a symbol for protection from elephant attacks (there aren’t elephants native to this part of Tanzania) so it is indeed a nod to the Indian influence that is part of Stone Town blood.

Walking around and exploring the deep depths of  Stone Town, doesn’t require much pre-planning as you can find a guide in the square who has a wealth of knowledge to offer for a small price.

It was awesome to spend time exploring Stone Town. 

Here’s our list of top things to do, places to see and eat in Stone Town:

Forodhani Gardensmuch like Drake, Forodhani comes alive in the nightime! It’s set right on the seafront and whether you are veggie, pesci or a serious meat-eater – there is indeed an option for you. Food is a huge part of any culture, and visiting Forodhani is a must do.

House of Wonders in Stone Town captured by sarahambitious

Visit the ‘House of Wonders’ – it was originally opened in 1883. It is the tallest and largest building in Stone Town.

Make an International Call at Jaws Corner captured by sarahambitious

Make an International Call at Jaws Corner – it works.

stack of fabrics in the market in stone town by sarah ambitious

Buy souvenirs – you’ll find something to take back for someone (any excuse, I know)

seafood platter from swahili house in stone town by sarahambitious

The Swahili Houseprovided awesome rooftop views, delicious food. If you’d like to spend time in Stone Town you can also lodge here. this seafood platter that consisted of a whole lobster, calamari, shrimps, mashed potatoes and a cup of tea ☕️ was a mere £20 🥺🥺

Fish Auction at the Darajani Markets by sarahambitious

Join the Fish Auction at the Darajani Markets. There are a variety of fresh seafood options and you have to get stuck in if you want a chance to win.

Take a Spice Tour – every spice you can think of is available. Freshhh! Take some home for your friends, your flatmate, your colleague. 

a traditional mask in swahili house in stone town, zanzibar, tanzania by sarah ambitious

Buy some coffee – everything is so fresh and pure 🥺 buy it all.

  • Prison Islandanother excursion you don’t have to neccesarily pre-book. See the Giant Tortoise and learn how prison island was built with the intention of housing prisoners; but was repurposed to help contain the bubonic plague epidemic that government officials feared would make its way on ships coming in from Egypt and Mumbai.
  • Visit the Slave Museum – if you fancy it (I opted not to, it’s not everyday relive trauma).
  • Visit Freddy Mercury‘s house! – arguably Tanzania’s most popular export.

Would you add a stop to Stone Town on your trip?

Keep up to date with us on @trippinwithsj, as always x

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Mombasa

Mombasa is Kenya’s oldest and second-largest city. It sits along the coastline, so you’ll have access to fresh seafood! And beautiful coastline views.

Mombasa was one of those places that I found via Instagram, I love visiting as many places as possible in one trip. I love walking around old towns and learning all their old history, you see the things that were left behind and the parts that have been included into the present day-to-day life.

Places to visit:

13th century afro pick
  1. Fort Jesus. Mombasa offers a blend of cultures; due to the colonial past the mark of each group can be seen in the city walls. Fort Jesus which was built by the Portuguese – (well it was physically built by Kenyan slaves under the instruction of the Portuguese but I digress 👀). My guide explained how the Portuguese came very arrogantly, but their only motive was to trade. The British came and spread Christianity ✝️, the Omanis spread Islam ☪️ causing great divide amongst the coastal Kenyan people. ⁣It’s weird because a building that was used to oppress now offers a livelihood for so many in Old Town.⁣
a tortoise

2. Haller Park offers some more animal lovin’! It is the transformation of a quarry wasteland into an ecological area. Kenyans are serious about their nature conservation, (aside from it obviously making up for a significant amount of their GDP) they feel it’s their job to keep the animals and earth safe. Haller Park is a true marvel to me and one of the many things we LOVE to see. If you time your arrival well you’ll be able to see various animals at their feeding times – giraffes 🦒(not as phenomenal as the Giraffe Centre), crocodiles 🐊 , hippos 🦛 and some elderly buffalos 🐃 too. ⁣

⁣It’s a fun day out and can be tied on to the back end of your exploration of Mombasa. ⁣Insider tip: listen out for the story of the Haller millipedes.

3. Spice Market – spices, herbs, coffee or tea leaves. It would be silly to not grab a bag of something and bring it back home with you. I see it as extending your holiday ever so slightly, the Kenyan coffee and tea is the truth!

4. Moi Avenue – is known for two pairs of giant aluminium elephant tusks. The tusks were commissioned in the 50s for Queen Elizabeths visit to Kenya, they also serve as a reminder to Kenyan trade poachers that elephants should never be paoched for the ivory trade.

Places to eat: Cafesserie Mombasa

It’s also worth mentioning that if you are safari’d out, Mombasa is a great gateway to other areas of Kenya that allow you to experience some hiking and/or cycling. I genuinely think there’s something to do for every type of traveller in Kenya.

As always, keep up to date with us on @trippinwithsj // @sarahambitious x